Letting Go of Home

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

For years I dreamed of travelling this fabulous continent with only a camper van and my best friend, (and hubby in case you are new to the blog) Q.  I was heavy into my career, building, growing, climbing that corporate ladder but as I sat in my office staring out the windows I would dream of being somewhere else.  I felt stifled, uninspired in my life.  I was successful but I felt empty inside like something was missing.

Snippets of the life I truly wanted were granted to me via holidays and vacations but once I returned to my life of commute, home, commute, I would quickly push those memories away so I wouldn’t be reminded I wasn’t where I was supposed to be.  With obligations growing I worked on, adding responsibilities to my job and knick knacks to my house.  Over time I would forget the feelings the vacations would illicit and be complacent with my mediocre existence as long as my house was beautiful, my children provided for and Q and I were at some sort of happy medium.  But when you exist, not live, but merely exist, regardless of how nice your surroundings may be, there is a coldness in your soul that begs you to find the warmth it desires.

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

 

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

Q and I have often said we were lucky to finally get the message to re-evaluate our lives, albeit came in the form of an illness.  But the truth is, would we have ever stopped, reassessed and taken action if the message hadn’t been so threatening?  After much consideration, we think not.  We are grateful our eyes were opened, and for the first time since we could remember, we could truly, purely see.

To choose to begin a nomadic lifestyle like I had always dreamed of was an easy decision.  The hard part came in letting go of our home.  Your home isn’t just “where you lay your hat”.  For the majority of us, a home has an address, a static view, with only neighbours changing occasionally.    Home is an anchor, keeping us from being drifters.

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

For Q and I, we had spent our working careers building our home, designing it into our own masterpiece that felt warm, comforting and happy.  It was the ambience we had chosen via our furniture, art and colour schemes.  Home, was where we placed the majority of our pay cheque, maintaining, and renovating.

When we had finally committed to this nomadic lifestyle it took me months to let go of my home.  I would wander into each room and pour my gaze over every inch from ceiling to floor.  I would reminisce about where I purchased that lamp, how did I come by that chair and I would ask in every room – how do I let go?  Our home is what had comforted me in the darkest days of my life, and contained some of my greatest joys.

My family had lived within these walls.

In every candlestick, throw pillow and mirror, there was a story and sacrifice made.  Fear welled within.  What if I could never replace my home – in the state in which I now owned it, filled with all the things I’ve ever wanted?

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

During our discussions of our fears of letting go of home something shifted in my thinking when Q finally relented and told me I could keep whatever I wanted.  We’d put it in storage until when and if we decided to finally be anchored to one street ever again.  The exercise of deciding what to keep had me gauge the value of each item.  I noted during this process each item independently held limited value in terms of sentiment.  It was collectively where these items’ greatest worth was noted but by themselves, they were just things we had purchased for no other reason than we liked the way it looked.

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

For the first time, I started to see my home objectively and realized the attachment I felt wasn’t to the frames that lined the shelves or the duvet that covered my bed.  The walls equated to nothing more than a house, and our belongings were just that.  Things that belonged to us.  I was bound to the parties we held for our family.  The Christmas get togethers, baby showers and birthdays.  I was held by the memories and the love that encompassed us.  The things that made it a home, wouldn’t be left behind or sold.  It was each and every one of us, our love for each other and the memories we had made that made this address our home.  And as long as we were all together, my home would always be with me, where ever I may be.  I was finally able to shift the value from items and place it where it belonged, on ourselves and the new experiences we would now have and the love and joy we will continue to share.  Home may not necessarily be where you lay your hat, but it definitely is where your heart is.

Too often in our culture, we place the utmost importance on things.  And like others, we too subscribed to this belief, but not anymore.  Time is more valuable than anything.  With time, we get to live, not exist.  And realizing our time would now be spent living, loving and laughing exactly how our heart and soul desires, we have no need or capacity for “stuff”.

full-time rv living, rv travel, rving

I won’t lie.  When we eventually walk out the front door the very last time it will be bittersweet.  I have loved the home we made for ourselves within these walls.  I will miss the warmth of the home we created within these walls.  But I will smile knowing, I will be taking what I love most about my home with me when I leave.

~ True North Nomad

Have you had to let go of something you love to fulfil a dream?  Tell us in the comments below.

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288 responses to “Letting Go of Home

  1. Pingback: Letting Go of Home — True North Nomad - Building Dreams Together·

  2. What a lovely post and a fabulous goal you’ve set yourselves. I can imagine the bittersweet element to finally walking out the door and unattaching from a permanent house. It’ll be totally liberating and you’ll feel a lightness once you become accustomed to your choice.

    Liked by 1 person

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  4. Such a timely read for me. In a month, I will leave my home of 28 years in Manila, Philippines to move to North Vancouver. I’m excited for the next chapter, but I can’t deny that it still hangs heavy on my heart knowing that nothing will ever be the same.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I love this, it really resonates with me. I am moving from Spain to Sydney this Sunday and I have found that it is one of the most bittersweet feelings I have ever experienced. Lots of love!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. you have such a lovely home – I can see what makes it hard to let go of! It takes incredible courage to make the choice you made. Thanks for sharing this inspiring post!

    Like

  7. Pingback: Letting Go of Home — True North Nomad – wandasncredible·

  8. Beautiful. I’ve been thinking about my home and how it won’t be “mine” pretty soon.. it’s been my home, my safe place for my entire life and it’s almost time for me to move out and for my parents to sell the house. It’s very nostalgic!

    Like

  9. Pingback: Letting Go of Home — True North Nomad – ✡ The Dave's tech & life blog·

  10. I really loved this post. I love my home and completely understand the attachment to the place you lay your head. I don’t have the nomad mindset in me, but I do appreciate and crave the urge to be unbound to material things.

    Liked by 1 person

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  13. My mom would love this piece for sure! The attachment that you so beautifully described is very relatable.When I left home, I had somewhat similar feelings,the walls I painted,the frames we so thoughtfully hung,waking up and looking at my garden.But well like you said,home is where the heart is!
    I would love to have you read my latest blog too… wordsswork.wordpress.com ”For all the mom’s ” Its about how my mother felt,when I first left home!

    Like

  14. Beautiful love this post and love your taste of decor. Blessings and love to you in your family on this journey to live. Never let this world throw the veil of materialism over your eyes furthermore. Thank you for sharing.

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  15. M.y husband and I are adventurous. Since retiring I am enjoying my house. I love my house. My city is what you call a “bedroom community” But we shower ourselves with travel. We raised children, so our vacations were camping and visiting national parks and have been to 11 cities in the US. Now, we plan the “Best of Italy”, Best of Greece, France, HongKong and China tours from Trafalgar Tours. Nothing holds us back and money has been generous for accommodations, dining, wining and tips. Best part of it is I have a dogsitter, my son to watch my dogs so we have peace of mind. I would suggest to go and see, smell, hear what’s IN the global alliance of countries.

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  16. Reblogged this on I'm Just Me and commented:
    Thoughts and emotions I have also felt though our process of change. It’s nice to know others experience this as well.

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  17. I see this from the flip side, I guess. I’ve never been overly attached to a house. Frankly, I’d happily unload the house I’m a reluctant landlord of, if we could. I’ve moved around with my husband a lot, he was in the military for several years, and while I have some belongings that I’m sentimental about, I’m just not overly attached to a *place. I’m still not sure if that’s a good or a bad thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. My wife and I were in your shoes a little more than a year ago when we walked away from our home and our careers to travel for adventure. I want to assure you what you gain is worth what you give up. Good luck in the future. I will look forward to reading what adventures come next.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. You have a really nice home and I totally understand how heartbreaking it might feel when you have to leave it for good. On the other hand I support your decision to choose to live your dreams instead, which I believe you will both find rewarding. These are the words of someone who never had a home in the first place. Me and my husband live in China, and are working on our little business adventure, our dream. We change homes almost every 2 to 3 years. While on the one hand it feels exhausting, we know we aren’t confined to anything and are doing it for the sake of our dreams, which makes us feel very happy. Though having a place we can call home somewhere down the line is one of our goals. Hope you start your journey as soon as possible. 😘

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  20. Over the years, we have made an effort to downsize with each new move.
    It’s made this most recent “empty nester” move more tolerable.
    Now, I’m thankful for the simplification it has brought into our lives. We spend less time and energy on house stuff and more time traveling and enjoying each other. Good luck on your journey!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. This is exactly what I am feeling right now. I am having a very strong pull for some adventurers!

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  22. Wow, what a beautiful blog, although I just wish to have a home for my three kids, I wish you all the best with your endeavours. If you have the time, please read my blog “moms daily battle….” Thank you and good luck….. 😁

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  23. Really enjoyed this post. I have done this twice sold my house and moved to a foreign country and then 13 years did it again 😅 so completely understand its not things but people and your time that counts.Going from work to home to work is certainly not living.

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  24. It’s a heart touching blog.. really nice. I would love to roam around the streets of different cities but at the end the feeling of coming back to own home cannot be expressed in words. It feels amazing to be at home.

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  25. Hi Lily. What a beautiful honest post about giving up what we think is important. I work as a travel writer and my family and I have been all over the world over the last few years. It gives you a whole new perspective on the value of physical possessions and the memories we associate with them.
    I can tell you we have a very close knit family and have all become the best of friends from being together on our own, against the world, so to speak.

    My children have sacrificed the closeness of family members for an adventure they will never forget and the benefits by far outweigh this. I will follow your adventures with interest.
    We now find ourselves in a remote rural village in the Philippines and are loving every minute of it.
    Best of luck.
    Robert.

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  26. I can imagine how hard it would be to leave a home you’ve spent years putting together and making memories in, but what an exciting adventure to look forward to! I have no doubt the amazing experiences you’ll have will be worth it!

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  27. I decided to rent out my first home when I moved closer to family several years ago. I wasn’t ready to let go and sell it. It wasn’t the stuff in the home – that all moved with me. It was, like you said, the memories in the home – the pride of purchasing my own house and living there independently, the joy of marrying my husband and moving him in, and all of the friends and happy moments that happened along the way. It’s been over 3 years but I’m still not ready to say goodbye to it. Maybe one day.

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  28. Beautiful! We had to sell our home 2 years ago due to a surprising PCS military move. It was very hard for me. Looking back, there are things I miss. But, like you pointed out, they are just things. We tend to put too much value on “things” rather than “people.” I love this post as I’m trying to live more minimalistic. Not only are your pictures beautiful and minimal, but your words are an encouragement as well. I look forward to following your journey!

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  29. So have you let go of your home? It’s such a beautiful home, I’d be scared to spend even a minute in there in case I got something dirty!!!! We’re about to sell our home and it’s a pretty exciting and scary journey. One of my children was born on the living room floor. I feel sad to leave my beautiful organic garden, my cozy home, but excited to move to the wild coast and build a new home. Best of luck on your journey!

    Liked by 1 person

    • This is our last week in our home… everything is either sold or given away with only a few remaining items we think we need in the future – we’ll see if thats true. It is scary, exciting and everthing in betwwen. Best of luck to you on your move and thanks for the well wishes!

      Like

  30. Thank you for posting this. I and family are just beginning to investigate up’ing and leaving our home and even though we are just at the beginning of the journey I can already feel the worry about it being ‘home’ creep in.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh yes, it took me months to finally get the nerve to let go. And then actually letting go took more months. It is a process, kind of like grieving, it comes in different waves with different feelings.

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      • I hope to get there, as like you I always saw myself with more freedom. Funny how life takes you a different way.

        Like

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